shirataki

Low carb Mac and Cheese

Delicious, cheesy and buttery, in this low-carb mac and cheese, the elbow macaroni is replaced by shirataki rice. Click for the recipe

Low Carb Pizza Crust Made from Shirataki Noodles

I’m not a saint. I love pizza – does anyone not love pizza? – but I don’t like the grains/gluten, and even gluten-free pizza crusts tend to be very high in carbs (and not very healthy carbs at that) and in calories. My cauliflower pizza crust is excellent, but now that I’ve fallen in love with zero-carb shirataki noodles, I was curious to see if I could make a low-carb pizza crust using them.

It took a couple of tries, but I’m happy to report that shirataki noodles make a lovely zero-carb pizza crust. Just like cauliflower pizza crust, the crust you get here is different than regular pizza crust – it’s softer, although shirataki low carb pizza crust is sturdier than cauliflower pizza crust and is easier to hold. In terms of taste, it’s fairly neutral, allowing the toppings to take center stage, as they should. Click for the recipe

sesame noodles

I already told you that I love shirataki noodles and feel that when prepared correctly, they provide a wonderful, low-carb, gluten-free alternative to noodles and pasta. I normally prepare them by boiling and dry-roasting and then simply toss with butter, garlic and Parmesan. But today I decided to try using them in a sesame noodles recipe.

Success! These sesame noodles are delicious, flavorful, super-filling, and healthy! No carb overload, and some great fiber for your good tummy bugs to work with. Click for the recipe

Lo Mein Noodles

I love noodles. I consider anything made with noodles as comfort food. Just the act of slurping noodles is comforting. It puts you in the moment, enjoying your food, forgetting about everything else. I love how noodles are long and chewy, and how they seem to absorb any sauce you pour on them. Which brings me to the sauce. The sauce I used in this lo mein recipe is amazing. It’s simplicity itself: soy sauce, peanut butter, red pepper flakes, sesame oil. But it all comes together beautifully. So good.

If you use shirataki noodles in this lo mein recipe, the added bonus is that you’ll save yourself quite a few calories and carbs, and you’ll be stuffed. I had to check the nutrition info twice to make sure this comes at under 400 calories per serving – these are 6 huge portions, and I was so full. And despite the bad rap that shirataki noodles get in terms of texture, I always say and I’ll say it again, that when prepared properly, the texture is fabulous. Plus you get the benefits of glucomannan, the fiber shirataki noodles are made of. Click for the recipe

Shirataki Noodles Recipe

Shirataki are traditional Japanese noodles made from the high-fiber konjac root. Since they are basically made of fiber and water, shirataki noodles have no nutritional value (no calories, no net carbs) despite being very filling. They also have no flavor of their own, which makes them an ideal vehicle for absorbing soups and sauces.

I find that shirataki noodles make a good pasta and noodle substitute, as long as you prepare them correctly (instructions below) – otherwise they are rubbery, slimy and unpleasant to eat. But prepared correctly and mixed with a yummy sauce, or added to soup, they do give a satisfactory answer to your noodle cravings, if you happen to have them.

Shirataki noodles also have health benefits. Konjac root is basically glucomannan, a soluble fiber, or prebiotic. It encourages the growth of good bacteria in our stomach. It CAN cause extra gas production in some people, so start slowly and see how it affects you.

There are plenty of ways to use shirataki noodles, but my favorite is the simplest – buttered shirataki noodles with Parmesan. Here’s how to make them. Click for the recipe