Vegetarian

Intensely flavorful, filling, and satisfying combinations of vegetables, eggs, dairy and whole grains.

scalloped potatoes

These delicious baked potato slices are browned and crispy on the outside and tender on the inside. It’s my version of scalloped potatoes – and since I bake the potato slices in a single layer and use just a little cream, they become crispy all over, not just on the top.
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ham and egg cups

Ham and egg cups are cute little quiches that can serve as a filling, on the go breakfast; as party appetizers; or as a snack. They are very good warm, at room temperature, and even cold straight out of the fridge. The big advantage of using ham slices as “crust” is not just the added flavor, but also reduced risk of sticking to the muffin tin compared with standard egg muffins.
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Shirataki Noodles Recipe

Shirataki are traditional Japanese noodles made from the high-fiber konjac root. Since they are basically made of fiber and water, shirataki noodles have no nutritional value (no calories, no net carbs) despite being very filling. They also have no flavor of their own, which makes them an ideal vehicle for absorbing soups and sauces.

I find that shirataki noodles make a good pasta and noodle substitute, as long as you prepare them correctly (instructions below) – otherwise they are rubbery, slimy and unpleasant to eat. But prepared correctly and mixed with a yummy sauce, or added to soup, they do give a satisfactory answer to your noodle cravings, if you happen to have them.

Shirataki noodles also have health benefits. Konjac root is basically glucomannan, a soluble fiber, or prebiotic. It encourages the growth of good bacteria in our stomach. It CAN cause extra gas production in some people, so the first time you try it, and until you know how shirataki noodles affect you, you better be alone. :)

There are plenty of ways to use shirataki noodles, but my favorite is the simplest – buttered shirataki noodles with Parmesan. Here’s how to make them.
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onion quiche

When reader John Razzano emailed me to ask if he could make my mini onion quiches in a 9-inch pie plate, I was intrigued. It sounded doable, and easy!
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spaghetti squash casserole

Got some leftover spaghetti squash and don’t feel like making spaghetti squash fritters? Try this cheesy, tasty spaghetti squash casserole.
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microwave sweet potatoes

It’s no wonder sweet potatoes have become the darling of the nutrition-conscious Paleo community. They’re high in carbs, but they are very nutritious. A smallish, 7-ounce sweet potato contains 940mg of potassium, 800% of your daily vitamin A requirement, 65% of vitamin C, half your Manganese requirement and a third of vitamin B6. Sweet potatoes are also incredibly delicious, and can be “baked” in the microwave with incredible results.
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stuffed portobello mushrooms

I love these stuffed portobello mushrooms – they are delicious and so pretty. They can work well as an appetizer when you host, or just serve them as a tasty side dish, as I did tonight.

Stuffed and baked portobello mushrooms can become soggy. To avoid sogginess:
1. Wipe clean, don’t wash them (they absorb water).
2. Pre-broil to release some of the water.
3. In the final stage of baking or broiling, broil or bake briefly, just until topping is browned. Baking too long will result in mushy mushrooms that have released their liquid into your filling. If that happens, the only thing you can do is to carefully drain the liquid, and place the mushrooms on paper towels to soak as much of the liquid as you can.
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