Vegan

The vegan recipes in this blog are in memory of Wesley Bronez.

eggplant chips

Crispy, savory and delicious, these eggplant chips make an excellent snack that satisfies that “crunchy/salty” craving. I use Japanese eggplants because their elongated shape allows for more uniform chips, but regular eggplants should work too. Click for the recipe

Roasted Cabbage

Cabbage is always delicious, even when very simply prepared with butter and garlic. But roasting cabbage certainly elevates it into a whole new level, turning the humble cabbage into a crisp, tasty, salty-spicy snack. Click for the recipe

Jicama Fries

Jicama fries make a tasty alternative to regular fries. In this version, the fries are coated in olive oil and yummy seasonings, then baked until tender. Microwaving the fries prior to baking them is optional, but keep in mind that if you don’t microwave them first, jicama fries retain some of their crunch even when baked for a long time. I tried both versions, and we all liked the microwaved fries better. Click for the recipe

Ratatouille

My version of ratatouille includes tomato paste, paprika and cayenne. The result is a deeply flavorful, earthy vegetable dish that goes wonderfully with almost any meat or fish, especially grilled. If you’re vegetarian, try serving it as a main dish, with a poached egg on top.

Ratatouille is one of those dishes that taste better after a few hours, after all the flavors have had a chance to meld together. I often make it in the morning, refrigerate, and at dinnertime, divide among plates and microwave briefly, just to bring it to room temperature. Click for the recipe

Eggplant Quiche

If you like eggplant, you’ll love this flavorful eggplant quiche. It’s so boldly flavored, it’s almost as if it contains meat (but it doesn’t). Great as a side dish to grilled meat, or serve it as the main dish in a vegetarian meal (in which case, you should probably double the recipe and bake in a 9 X 13-inch baking dish). Click for the recipe

roasted artichoke

I love food that must be eaten slowly, deliberately. I love lobsters, whole fish, and artichokes. I dislike food that you tend to gobble up fast, like fast-food burgers and most sandwiches. But I like artichokes not just because it takes 20 minutes or so to eat one – I also love their intense, unique flavor and the way you slowly build your way from the outer, tougher leaves, through the inner, delicate, tasty leaves, all the way to the yummy heart. Plus, artichokes are good for you – they’re high in fiber, potassium, vitamin C and magnesium.

This simple recipe for roasted artichokes takes some time, but in every other respect, it’s very easy. And the result is a tender, tasty artichoke, flavored with olive oil, lemon and garlic – a true delicacy. Click for the recipe

sauteed broccolini

Most recipes for sautéed broccolini will tell you to blanch the broccolini first (cook briefly in salted water, then quickly rinse in cold water or dip in ice water). But I like to sauté the broccolini first, until browned and crisp, then add a bit of water to the hot pan, cover and briefly steam, just until the stems are crisp-tender. Click for the recipe