Primal and Paleo Recipes

My Primal and Paleo recipes focus on animal protein (including fermented dairy), vegetables, good fats and good carbs (such as root vegetables and fruit), while avoiding grains, beans, legumes and refined sugar.

lamb shanks

These flavorful, tender, fall-off-the-bone lamb shanks are browned in olive oil, then slowly cooked in a slow cooker with broth and aromatics until very tender. To quickly thicken the sauce, allow it to boil and then sprinkle a tablespoon of flour and keep whisking until it thickens. If you prefer to avoid flour, keep the cooked lamb shanks warm and reduce the sauce by boiling, as outlined below.

These lamb shanks are wonderful over mashed cauliflower.
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Stuffed Poblano Peppers

A fiesta of flavors and colors, these stuffed poblano peppers are incredibly flavorful. They are pretty too: serve them as an appetizer, or as I did tonight, two per person as the main course with a side of a simple tossed salad.
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roasted artichoke

I love food that must be eaten slowly, deliberately. I love lobsters, whole fish, and artichokes. I dislike food that you tend to gobble up fast, like fast-food burgers and most sandwiches. But I like artichokes not just because it takes 20 minutes or so to eat one – I also love their intense, unique flavor and the way you slowly build your way from the outer, tougher leaves, through the inner, delicate, tasty leaves, all the way to the yummy heart. Plus, artichokes are good for you – they’re high in fiber, potassium, vitamin C and magnesium.

This simple recipe for roasted artichokes takes some time, but in every other respect, it’s very easy. And the result is a tender, tasty artichoke, flavored with olive oil, lemon and garlic – a true delicacy.
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ham and egg cups

Ham and egg cups are cute little quiches that can serve as a filling, on the go breakfast; as party appetizers; or as a snack. They are very good warm, at room temperature, and even cold straight out of the fridge. The big advantage of using ham slices as “crust” is not just the added flavor, but also reduced risk of sticking to the muffin tin compared with standard egg muffins.
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gluten free crab cakes

These delicious, crispy crab cakes don’t contain breadcrumbs – I used almond flour instead.

As always when using crab meat in recipes, the fresher the crab meat you use, the better the dish will taste. Fresh crabmeat is delicate and sweet, but the supermarket lump crabmeat that comes in small plastic containers tends to be quite fishy. If you don’t want to steam your own crabs, and you have Whole Foods in your area, try the crabmeat sold at their seafood counter.

It’s very important to chill the crab cakes for at least an hour prior to frying them – they are very delicate and could easily fall apart if not chilled first.
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Shirataki Noodles Recipe

Shirataki are traditional Japanese noodles made from the high-fiber konjac root. Since they are basically made of fiber and water, shirataki noodles have no nutritional value (no calories, no net carbs) despite being very filling. They also have no flavor of their own, which makes them an ideal vehicle for absorbing soups and sauces.

I find that shirataki noodles make a good pasta and noodle substitute, as long as you prepare them correctly (instructions below) – otherwise they are rubbery, slimy and unpleasant to eat. But prepared correctly and mixed with a yummy sauce, or added to soup, they do give a satisfactory answer to your noodle cravings, if you happen to have them.

Shirataki noodles also have health benefits. Konjac root is basically glucomannan, a soluble fiber, or prebiotic. It encourages the growth of good bacteria in our stomach. It CAN cause extra gas production in some people, so the first time you try it, and until you know how shirataki noodles affect you, you better be alone. :)

There are plenty of ways to use shirataki noodles, but my favorite is the simplest – buttered shirataki noodles with Parmesan. Here’s how to make them.
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seared scallops

Some types of meat and seafood are so innately delicious, the only real requirement from the cook is not to ruin them by overcooking. This is true for salmon, for lamb chops, and definitely for scallops. Sweet, succulent and meaty, I find that scallops need very little added flavor – just sprinkle with salt and pepper, sear in butter and olive oil to form a nice crust, and serve.
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