Low Carb

If you’re having trouble with your blood sugar (pre-diabetes, reactive hypoglycemia or diabetes), or if you need to lose weight but find that you’re unable to do it (or to maintain weight loss) on the standard low-fat, high-carb diet, I highly recommend that you talk to your doctor about switching to a low-carb, moderate protein, high-fat diet. The recipes featured here typically contain 10 grams of net carbs per serving or less, making them suitable even for very low-carb diets.

lamb shanks

These flavorful, tender, fall-off-the-bone lamb shanks are browned in olive oil, then slowly cooked in a slow cooker with broth and aromatics until very tender. To quickly thicken the sauce, allow it to boil and then sprinkle a tablespoon of flour and keep whisking until it thickens. If you prefer to avoid flour, keep the cooked lamb shanks warm and reduce the sauce by boiling, as outlined below.

These lamb shanks are wonderful over mashed cauliflower.
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low carb microwave bread

Just so we’re clear, this low-carb microwave bread is a compromise. It’s not true bread, of course – it’s soft and a little eggy. But if you’re trying to control your carbs, or need to avoid gluten, this microwave bread adds a nice variety to breakfast and lunch. It’s ready in less than five minutes, and has a spongy texture that readily soaks up butter, honey or jam. It’s also good topped with cream cheese and smoked salmon, or with mustard and ham.
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Stuffed Poblano Peppers

A fiesta of flavors and colors, these stuffed poblano peppers are incredibly flavorful. They are pretty too: serve them as an appetizer, or as I did tonight, two per person as the main course with a side of a simple tossed salad.
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Zucchini Lasagna

Zucchini slices replace the noodles in this low-carb, gluten-free zucchini lasagna. Of course, zucchini slices don’t work as well as noodles in terms of keeping the lasagna’s shape, so this zucchini lasagna is flimsier than traditional lasagna, but in terms of flavor, it’s another victory to low carb and another proof that the starches in many recipes merely absorb other flavors. This lasagna tastes amazing, so good in fact that I don’t plan on making it too often, since I found myself having THREE, yes three slices instead of the one I was planning to have – yes, it is that good.

Zucchini is very watery, so do go through the (admittedly annoying) extra step of grilling the zucchini slices before assembling the lasagna. Grilling will help dry them off and remove some of the water. Otherwise, they will release their water into the lasagna as it bakes – not good.

Needless to say, the flavor of your lasagna will greatly depend on the marinara sauce you use. I always use sugar-free spaghetti sauce, and my favorite is Rao’s – it has a clean list of ingredients and the spicy Arrabbiata sauce is especially amazing – this is the one I used in this recipe. Rao’s used to only be available at Whole Foods, but lately I’ve been seeing it in my supermarket too. Of course, just like everything else on earth, it’s also available on Amazon.
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ham and egg cups

Ham and egg cups are cute little quiches that can serve as a filling, on the go breakfast; as party appetizers; or as a snack. They are very good warm, at room temperature, and even cold straight out of the fridge. The big advantage of using ham slices as “crust” is not just the added flavor, but also reduced risk of sticking to the muffin tin compared with standard egg muffins.
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gluten free crab cakes

These delicious, crispy crab cakes don’t contain breadcrumbs – I used almond flour instead.

As always when using crab meat in recipes, the fresher the crab meat you use, the better the dish will taste. Fresh crabmeat is delicate and sweet, but the supermarket lump crabmeat that comes in small plastic containers tends to be quite fishy. If you don’t want to steam your own crabs, and you have Whole Foods in your area, try the crabmeat sold at their seafood counter.

It’s very important to chill the crab cakes for at least an hour prior to frying them – they are very delicate and could easily fall apart if not chilled first.
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Shirataki Noodles Recipe

Shirataki are traditional Japanese noodles made from the high-fiber konjac root. Since they are basically made of fiber and water, shirataki noodles have no nutritional value (no calories, no net carbs) despite being very filling. They also have no flavor of their own, which makes them an ideal vehicle for absorbing soups and sauces.

I find that shirataki noodles make a good pasta and noodle substitute, as long as you prepare them correctly (instructions below) – otherwise they are rubbery, slimy and unpleasant to eat. But prepared correctly and mixed with a yummy sauce, or added to soup, they do give a satisfactory answer to your noodle cravings, if you happen to have them.

Shirataki noodles also have health benefits. Konjac root is basically glucomannan, a soluble fiber, or prebiotic. It encourages the growth of good bacteria in our stomach. It CAN cause extra gas production in some people, so the first time you try it, and until you know how shirataki noodles affect you, you better be alone. :)

There are plenty of ways to use shirataki noodles, but my favorite is the simplest – buttered shirataki noodles with Parmesan. Here’s how to make them.
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